Federation of Gay Games News

Here you will find all the latest news from The Federation of Gay Games and on sport and culture in our community. 

If you have any news you would like to include or have any media enquiries please contact the relevant person on our contact page.

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  • 17 Aug 2019 13:05 | Anonymous

    As reported in the Washington Blade

    15 August 2019 by Kevin Majoros

    In 1962, a space combat video game called Spacewar! was developed by Steve Russell to be installed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Its installation spread to other institutions making it the first known video game to be played at multiple computer locations.

    Ten years later at Stanford University, a selected list of the best Spacewar! players were invited to watch and participate in a video game competition.

    The combination of the competitive elements of gaming with a fan base laid the groundwork for what has become one of the most popular activities watched and played around the world.

    The 2019 Global Games Market report forecasts that 2.5 billion gamers across the world will spend $152.1 billion on games in 2019.

    The competitive side of gaming known as esports is expected to have a total audience of 454 million viewers and revenues that will top $1 billion. Online streaming platforms like Twitch and YouTube have served to launch esports into the stratosphere.

    But is it really a sport?

    Three things have to happen for a game to become a sport. There has to be competition, tournaments and spectators. The rise of esports has all that and more. Major spectator events in the form of streamed competitions with organized leagues, professional players that can be viewed anywhere, and live events in major offline sports venues.

    Adding to the credibility of esports last month was the awarding of an ESPY for best esports moment. At the conclusion of the voting, which included 231,465 votes on Twitter alone, oLarry picked up the win over Ninja / Marshmello.

    One esport player who was nominated in the best esports moment category was SonicFox aka Dominique McLean for winning EVO after switching sides.

    SonicFox is a black, openly gay furry who also happens to be one of the best fighting game players in the world. He is a combination of some of the least represented demographics of players in the sport today. At 21 years of age, he has already won 52 tournaments.

    Also taking note of the growing popularity of esports is the LGBT sports community. The Federation of Gay Games announced in June, the list of 36 sports that will be contested at Gay Games 11 Hong Kong in 2022.

    For the first time in the history of the Gay Games, esports and dodgeball were among the sports to be included in the final sports list.

    The host cities of the Gay Games follow a mandated list of core sports and can then add sports that are popular in their regions. Both esports and dodgeball are wildly popular in Hong Kong.

    “The appetite for specific sports changes over time and we have to open up our minds as to what that means for the future,” says Les Johnson, vice president of external affairs for the Federation of Gay Games. “Both sports will go through a ‘Red Book’ process where we establish the rules for play, age groups and medal counts.”

    Of note is that esports were a part of the sports list when D.C. made it to the final three cities of the 2022 Gay Games bid process.

    The competitive side of gaming known as esports is expected to have a total audience of 454 million viewers and revenues that will top $1 billion. (Photo from the esports event at the 2019 Sin City Classic)

    Earlier this year in January, esports debuted at the Sin City Classic Sports Festival in Las Vegas. Sin City is the largest annual LGBT sporting event in the world and draws more than 7,000 athletes participating in 24 sports.

    Stepping in on short notice to coordinate the addition of esports were Garrett Pattiani and Russ White. They are the co-founders/co-publishers of QLife Magazine,Federated Gaymers League, the International Drag Queen Database and UV Beach Club.

    The competition was hosted at The Wall Gaming Lounge inside the Rio All-Suite Hotel & Casino. Attendees from the other Sin City sports were invited to attend as spectators and experience virtual reality (VR) demonstrations.

    One of Pattiani and White’s many side gigs is producing virtual reality festivals which includes egaming through VR.

    “We brought along VR Oculus headsets for the gamers and spectators to experience in demo stations,” says Pattiani. “Most gamers haven’t experienced VR gaming and we believe that it will be the esport game of choice in the future.”

    The tournament featured two traditional esport games – Fortnite and Super Smash Bros. Ultimate. For the third game of the tournament, Pattiani and White added a VR element by introducing the competitors to Ping! (Pong).

    “There has been a cost barrier for VR because game development is expensive,” Pattiani says. “As the cost comes down and more people gain access to the technology, gamers will diversify, and new spaces will be created.”

    The attraction to esports for the LGBT community is that it creates a safe space where they can be themselves.

    “You can be anybody you want to be – you can create avatars to mimic how you identify, you can change your name and change your hair color,” says Pattiani. “These esports communities create a space where you can be your true self and offers the gamer the ability to explore identities.”

    Pattiani and White have a vision for the future that includes expanding esports at the Sin City Classic.

    “We have the technology to create an LGBT community database of gamers worldwide. Leagues where they would be playing esports against each other, city against city,” says White. “With sponsorships and prize money, we could draw the best players to Vegas to compete in future Sin City Classics.”

  • 31 Jul 2019 10:51 | Anonymous

    Please support this Kickstarter campaign on behalf of the Lotus Sports Club in Cambodia. There are just three more days left in this fundraising campaign. It will only be funded if it reaches its goal by Sun, August 4 2019 3:18 AM PDT. They are 88% of the way to achieving the funding mark.


    The Federation of Gay Games is thrilled to support an exciting film project from Document Our History Now and Destination Justice, and invite you to do the same! Please help see that this vanguard project gets completed. Thank you!
    #cambodia #lgbt #lgbtrights #lesbian #lgbtsports

  • 13 Jul 2019 20:43 | Anonymous

    "Pull me down, I will come back stronger!" Dutee Chand, who has faced a backlash since coming out as bisexual last month, wrote on Twitter.

    Reprinted from Gay Star News


    Sprinter Dutee Chand is officially the fastest woman in India. (Photo: Twitter)

    India’s first openly-LGBTI athlete, sprinter Dutee Chand, silenced critics on Wednesday (10 July).

    She became the first Indian ever to win gold in a 100-meter race at a global sports meet.

    "Pull me down, I will come back stronger!" the 23-year-old wrote on Twitter, sharing a photo of her medal.

    The bisexual sprinter made headlines last month when she revealed her relationship with another woman. She became the first Indian sports star to publicly admit being in a same-sex relationship.

    To read the entire article, click HERE.

    To watch this gold-medal race, click HERE.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    The Federation of Gay Games would also like to congratulate Dutee Chand for being featured on the cover of Cosmopolitan magazine in India in their July 2019 issue. Read about it HERE.


  • 12 Jul 2019 10:30 | Anonymous

    On 9 July 2019, Kile Ozier received one of the highest honors given by the Federation of Gay Games: Honorary Life Member status. This had been voted on by the FGG Board and Assembly at a recent annual meeting in Ireland. The award was presented to Kile by FGG Officer of Marketing Doug Litwin


    The presentation took place on Castro Street in San Francisco, not far from a sidewalk plaque that honors Gay Games founder Dr. Tom Waddell (learn more about the Rainbow Honor Walk HERE).

    See the entire list of Honorary Life Members HERE.

    Upon receiving this honor, here is what Kile had to say...

    "Way back in 1981-ish, shortly after I moved to San Francisco and came out, a new friend of mine introduced me to this guy, Tom, who was trying to create a “Gay Olympics.” My friend Russ thought we should know each other. I remember riding around town with Tom in his sports car (an MG, I think?) with flyers for a promotional event. I thought he was a great guy with a very cool idea and was happy to help out but despite having been a college athlete (swimming), I didn’t really consider myself a “sports guy.”

    What an idiot.

    I had no idea that what Tom envisioned would become a powerful reality; changing the lives of millions of men and women, worldwide… including mine.

    A few years later, in Kezar Stadium for the Opening Ceremony; the fog cleared and I Got It. Watching the event grow, exponentially, in the following years was thrilling to witness. As the Games grew in magnitude to surpass the numbers of the Other Olympics and become the largest sports event in the world, and as the run-up to Gay Games IV in NYC began, I saw an opportunity for me to possibly support this sports phenomenon with Ceremony to match Tom’s Olympic Vision.

    Fortunately, Willa Taylor agreed that I was The Guy, and hired me.

    I was very lucky to be the right guy at the right place and the right time. The production team that gathered in NYC was an inspired, committed, generous collection of accomplished and experienced, world-class talent. Michael Graziano, Steve Gallagher, Alan Hatton, Jana Panarites, Jerry Mitchell, Jonathan Sheffer, Eric Schorr, Larry Baker, Rich Quigley, Steve Boyd, Dave Brunetti and scores of kickass production and creative talent from Broadway and off-Broadway theatre — all these men and women gave their all to make the Ceremonies world-class and raise the profile and athlete’s experience of the Games to the level they deserved… to create the Olympic Experience that Tom envisioned; for LGBT+ athletes to stride into a stadium in the bright light of day as Who They Are - brilliantly lit and enthusiastically celebrated.

    We did that. None of us could have done that alone; none of us could have done that without the hard work done by teams and talent who set precedent in the previous quadrennials. I was lucky to have been given this opportunity and to continue beyond 1994 on and off the FGG Board and again with the 2006 Ceremonies in Chicago.

    Through all of this, I’ve been privileged to meet, collaborate, debate, and work alongside men and women from across the globe who share commitment to the vision and dream.

    To be recognized and acknowledged by the FGG in this way is both thrilling and humbling (that “humbling” may cause laughter in some quarters). Thank you to the Board and Members of the Federation of Gay Games for this Honor. I was and am honored to have been able to contribute to an unequaled legacy."


    KILE OZIER GAY GAMES EXPERIENCE

    1993 - 1994

    Produced and Directed the Opening Ceremony (Wien Stadium @ Columbia University) and Closing Ceremony (Yankee Stadium) for Gay Games IV.

    As a part of which commissioned and recorded

    The FGG's own "Fanfare and Processional” - written by Eric Schorr

    FGG anthem, “Take the Flame” - written by Henry Krieger (“Dream Girls,” “Kinky Boots”) and performed by Lillias White, and “Coming of Age” - written by Jonathan Sheffer

    also Greg Louganis’ “coming out / welcome video” and

    Tom Waddell Tribute video.

    Talent: Judith Light, Bill T. Jones, Jerry Mitchell choreographer (“Legally Blond,” “Full Monty,” Director: “La Cage Aux Folles,” “Kinky Boots”) Cyndi Lauper, Patti LaBelle, Aprile Millo, Sir Ian McKellen, Armistead Maupin, Kathy Najimi, Harvey Fierstein, Crystal Waters, Phyllis Hyman, Desmond Child, Marga Gomez, Suzanne Westenhoefer, David Kopay, Lillias White, Aaron Lee Battle.

    1998 - Amsterdam for Gay Games V

    Participated in Swimming

    1999 - Berlin for FGG annual meeting

    Created the "Guidelines for Protocol & Ceremonies” as chair of a committee I can’t remember the name of for the FGG.

    2002 - Sydney for Gay Games VI

    Board member

    Participated in Swimming

    2006 - Chicago for Gay Games VII

    Produced & Directed Opening Ceremonies for Gay Games VIII at Soldier Field,

    Produced & Directed Closing Ceremonies at Wrigley Field

    Bronze medal in Physique

    Talent: Suzanne Westenhoefer, George Takei, Andy Bell (Erasure), Heather Small, Esera Tuaolo, Cyndi Lauper, Levi Kreis, Eric Himan, Kate Clinton, Margaret Cho, Megan Mullally, Kristine W., Shavonne Conroy, Keith Boykin,

    2010 - Cologne for Gay Games VIII

    Participated in Physique

  • 05 Jul 2019 20:50 | Anonymous

    Coming on the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots, this year’s IGLA championships carried enormous significance

    Reported by Jeff Commings on the U.S. Masters Swimming web site


    Peter Kingan was one of the busiest athletes at this year’s International Gay and Lesbian Aquatics championships in New York City. On some days, he woke up early to race in the swimming competition, then return in the afternoon to play a water polo game.

    But the 70-year-old was all smiles after five days of competing at the Flushing Meadows Corona Park Aquatic Center, showing no signs of fatigue. It certainly didn’t hurt that he set a meet record in his top race, the 50-meter breaststroke.

    “I wouldn’t want to be anywhere else right now,” Kingan says shortly after racing the 100 breaststroke to close out the meet. “I’m a little tired but having the time of my life.”

    Kingan was one of 922 athletes who came to the Big Apple for six days of competition at the annual event that featured all four aquatic sports: swimming, diving, water polo, and synchronized swimming. It was no accident that this year’s meet took place in New York City. The city was marking the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Inn uprising in Manhattan, when gay men and women rioted against a police raid in June 1969. The riot blossomed into an annual demonstration that spread around the world, leading to Pride Month celebrations across the globe every June.

    To read the entire article, click HERE.

  • 04 Jul 2019 21:52 | Anonymous

    E-Sports will be offered for the first time at Gay Games 11 in Hong Kong in November, 2022 (note: the particular video games to be used in the event are not known). We will share news of this growing sport with our LGBT+ readers here when it occurs.

    As reported on Outsports.com, 2 July 2019

    Dominique “SonicFox” McLean won the CEO 2019 Mortal Kombat 11 championship in an all-gay grand final and gifted his medal to a young black fan.

    Dominique “SonicFox” McLean Francisco Suarez

    Dominique “SonicFox” McLean ended Pride month in style Sunday by taking home the Mortal Kombat 11 championship at Community Effort Orlando 2019.

    True to his character, SonicFox entered the arena to Sardonyx’s theme, a whimsical fusion character from the pro-LGBTQ cartoon Steven Universe, clad in his trademark fursuit. He dominated the CEO ring after stumbling early in the MK 11 top 8. His time in the winner’s bracket was short-lived after an opening loss to fellow gay fighting game pro Ryan “Dragon” Walker, but the loss seemingly stirred a slumbering beast within the gay esports icon.

    SonicFox thrashed his way through the loser’s bracket following the loss, refusing to surrender a single set on his way to an all-gay grand finals rematch with Dragon. The pride of Echo Fox decidedly reset the bracket with a 3-1 victory, but lost the first set of the championship match. That first loss could be attributed to SonicFox switching away from his most used character, Cassie Cage, to Jacqui Briggs, a character he began learning in more detail since his second place finish at Combo Breaker last month.


    To read the complete article, click HERE.

  • 23 Jun 2019 12:43 | Anonymous

    The sheer number of out, queer players in professional soccer sets an inspiring new bar for lesbian visibility.


    Mal Pugh, Crystal Dunn, Alex Morgan, Carli Lloyd and Megan Rapinoe. Photo courtesy of Nike

    A great article appeared on them 29 June regarding the 5 openly queer players on the US National Women's Soccer Team now participating in the FIFA World Cup in France.

    HERE is a link to the article.


    A similar article on Outsports.com reports that there are 36 out gay, lesbian and bisexual women in the FIFA World Cup — 34 players, one coach and a trainer. Read that article HERE.

  • 09 Jun 2019 10:28 | Anonymous


    In a press release published on 9 June 2019, the Federation of Gay Games (FGG) together with the Gay Games 11 Hong Kong 2022’s management team announced today the 36 sports which will be offered at the event hosted in Hong Kong in November 2022. For the first time in the history of the Gay Games, E-Sports and Dodgeball are among the sports to be included in the final sports list.

    The 36 sports featured at Gay Games 11 Hong Kong 2022 are:

    Aquatic Sports

    1. Diving

    2. Open Water Swimming

    3. Synchronised Swimming

    4. Swimming / Pink Flamingo

    5. Water Polo

    Athletics Sports

    6. Marathon: Full

    7. Marathon: Half

    8. Road Race: 10km

    9. Road Race: 5km

    10. Track & Field

    11. Trail Running

    19. Combined Events: Triathlon

    Ballgames Sports

    12. Basketball and Wheelchair Basketball

    13. Dodgeball **

    14. Football (Soccer)

    15. Rugby Sevens

    16. Softball

    17. Volleyball

    Cross-disciplinary Sports

    18. Cheerleading *

    20. Dance Sport

    21. E-Sports **

    22. Figure Skating *

    23. Golf

    24. Ten Pin Bowling

    Racquet Sports

    25. Badminton

    26. Squash

    27. Table Tennis

    28. Tennis

    Mat Sports

    29. Fencing

    30. Martial Arts

    31. Physique Bodybuilding

    32. Powerlifting

    33. Wrestling

    Water sports

    34. Rowing

    35. Dragon Boat Racing

    36. Sailing

    * Sports which were not featured in the initial proposal (bid book) but are now added to the final list due to the large support in the region.

    ** Sports which were not featured in the initial proposal (bid book) but are now added to the final list due to the large support in the region. These sports are also making a historical entry in the Gay Games.

    To read the entire press release, click List of GGHK Sports FGG_GGHK_Press Release.pdf

  • 08 Jun 2019 12:22 | Anonymous

    During the month of June, 2019 (pride month in many places), Outsports.com is profiling 30 LGBTQ athletes who show "Stonewall Spirit" in honor of the 50th Anniversary of the Stonewall rebellion in New York City.


    Tom Waddell in the discus event at Gay Games I in 1982

    On 2 June, Gay Games founder Dr. Tom Waddell was profiled as one of these athletes. You can find the article HERE.

    In the description of this month-long series, Outsports.com said... "In commemoration of Pride Month and the 50th year since the Stonewall Inn riots in New York, Outsports is profiling one out athlete daily who embodies the 'Stonewall Spirit,' reflecting the courage of those who launched the modern LGBTQ rights movement."

    Enjoy this excellent profile of Gay Games founder Tom Waddell.

  • 05 Jun 2019 15:13 | Anonymous

    As a follow-up to the Federation of Gay Games' statement regarding Caster Semenya, news stories are reporting that Caster Semenya has been cleared to compete without taking medication to lower her testosterone levels while her appeal is pending after a court in Switzerland ordered an immediate suspension of the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) regulations.

    Here are links to two articles regarding this development:

    Inside The Games  

    Outsports


    The FGG's previous statement in support of Caster Semenya may be found HERE.

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