Federation of Gay Games News

Here you will find all the latest news from The Federation of Gay Games and on sport and culture in our community. 

If you have any news you would like to include or have any media enquiries please contact the relevant person on our contact page.

You can also check out the history of the Gay Games in photos and videos by visiting our massive online archives HERE.

  • 26 Feb 2020 09:46 | Anonymous

    Gay Games icon Susan McGreivy passed away on November 30, 2019. This loving tribute to her memory was written by Federation of Gay Games Honorary Life Member Shamey Cramer.


    Lighting the cauldron at Gay Games I Opening Ceremony: George Frenn (left) and Susan McGreivy (right).
    Photo: Lisa Kanemoto

    When I walked into the Mother Lode bar in West Hollywood on Saturday, 15 May 1982, I had no idea how quickly my life was going to change. After ordering a Long Island Iced Tea, I went to the back to use a payphone to call my friends about plans for the evening.

    As I headed down the short hallway, a poster on the wall caught my eye - it was marketing an event to be held in San Francisco later that summer called the Gay Olympic Games. My heart began to race. Three generations of my family had been involved with professional and community sports as athletes and administrators. I had written, produced and directed local pageants with my Mother as a teenager, and had moved to Los Angeles in 1980, partly to pursue my passion of working on the Olympic Games, with the dream of someday producing the Opening and Closing Ceremonies. Getting involved with an event that used sport to promote acceptance and inclusion on a global scale was tailor-made for my background, and my desire to be an out and proud gay athlete. I had trained and competed in cycling and middle distance running events, but knew that if I were to be involved, the best contribution I could make would be at the administrative and organizing level.

    I quickly jotted down the phone number, and tucked it into my pocket. That week at work, I called the number and spoke with Dr. Thomas F. Waddell, the man behind this audacious project. I expressed my desire to be active in organizing a contingent from Los Angeles. He immediately put me in touch with famed attorney Susan Gray McGreivy.

    In 1955, Susan competed as a 15-year-old high school student at the Amateur Athletic Union’s indoor swim meet, winning the 250 and 500 yard freestyles; and a bronze medal in the 400 free at the 1955 Pan American Games. The following year, she competed at the 1956 Olympics in Melbourne Australia.

    Susan later attended Northwestern University, became a teacher in California, briefly coached the Thailand swim team, volunteered with the Peace Corps, and then married, raising two children before coming out. She graduated from law school in 1977, and became attorney for the Gay Community Services Center of Hollywood (later known as the Los Angeles Gay & Lesbian Center), which led to her becoming a civil rights attorney for the Southern California ACLU (American Civil Liberties Union), with a focus on gay and lesbian rights. She later represented the ACLU on cases against the Boy Scouts of America, and in defense of the Norton Sound Eight.

    In 1983, she also filed a suit against the Los Angeles Olympic Organizing Committee, demanding that the 5,000 and 10,000 distance races (track & field) be added to the program for women. She was also working on the case against the United States Olympic Committee (USOC), after they sued Dr. Waddell and San Francisco Arts & Athletics, the organization producing the Gay Olympic Games, over the use of the word “Olympic.”

    I met Susan the night of June 1 at the Melting Pot Cafe on Melrose Avenue in West Hollywood. It was a typical 1970s-style cafe, with lots of wood interior, potted plants and hanging ferns. Given her reputation, I was more than a bit nervous to meet her. After all, I was a 22-year-old who was just dipping his toe into gay rights activism, meeting one of the most notable and respected gay rights activist lawyers in town (the term LGBT had yet to be invented).

    Tom had asked her to organize Team Los Angeles. When I mentioned that I was more than willing to assist her in any way possible, she laughed. Given the heavy work load she had assisting San Francisco-based attorney Mary Dunlap on the Olympic case, she really didn’t have time to do any organizing for the Games. The best way I could help her, she stated, was to take over the entire operation of the team from her. She handed me the list of the names and addresses of those who had already registered, but had not been contacted by anyone locally. And that is how I became the founder of Team Los Angeles that fateful evening.

    Despite the short time frame, we were able to register 147 athletes for those first Games - the largest out-of-town contingent - as well as have the Gay Men’s Chorus of Los Angeles and the Great American Yankee Freedom Marching Band to participate in the cultural events, including the Opening and Closing Ceremonies. Since the USOC had been successful in obtaining an injunction against the Games, they had now been forced to be called simply The Gay Games.

    One of the highlights of the Opening Ceremony was the lighting of the cauldron. Imagine how proud we were as Angelenos to see Susan, along with Olympic hammer thrower George Frenn, who had grown up in the San Fernando Valley, conduct the honours of lighting the cauldron, signaling the official opening of the Gay Games.

    I remained involved with the Gay Games movement through 1985, working with Tom and ten other co-chairs from Canada and the United States to form the first international governing body; and producing the Festival Games, the first-ever annual multi-sport festival hosted by the LGBTQ+ community. I re-engaged with the Gay Games in 2000 as a member of West Hollywood Aquatics water polo team, and founder/CEO of the Los Angeles bid team seeking to host Gay Games VII in 2006.

    In 2009, a documentary was released entitled “Claiming the Title: The Gay Olympics on Trial.“ When I saw Susan McGreivy, I knew I had to reconnect with her. Thanks to the advent of social media, I was able to track her down. Although we had had little contact back in the early 1980’s, we quickly struck up a friendship, often sharing each other’s posts on social media. From the very beginning of our online friendship, we began interacting on a daily basis, often sharing humorous posts as well as serious ones.

    When I was elected to the Federation of Gay Games Board of Directors in 2011 as Officer of Ceremonies, one of my tasks was to oversee the Legacy Awards presentations and Memorial Moment at the Annual General Assembly.


    Susan McGreivy with Shamey Cramer, Cleveland AGA, 2013

    When we held the AGA in Cleveland in 2013, the Awards Committee chose to honour two of our outstanding Gay Games pioneers: Jean-Nickolaus Tretter, co-founder of Team Minnesota and the person Tom Waddell chose to head up the International Gay Olympic Association (the predecessor to the FGG), and Susan.

    Both Jean and Susan flew to Cleveland to accept their awards. The night prior to the opening day reception, Susan and I both stayed at the home of Catherine Toth and Maureen Povinelli, two of the many local community members who helped make Gay Games 9 the success it was. It was also the first time Susan and I had been face-to-face since our first meeting back in June 1982.


    FGG Legacy Award recipients, 2013: Susan McGreivy (far left), Jordan Windle (center, surrounded by his two dads), and Jean-Nickolaus Tretter (far right)
     

    Since we were both living in California, three hours behind local Cleveland time, we were up until 2:00 am, having one of those late-night, intense conversations that was full of humour, frustration and wistfulness. Neither of us wanted to go to bed, but we both had a full day ahead of us.

    When she received her award, she directed her comments toward the sad state of affairs with the Olympic Movement, given the news coming out of Russia and their anti-gay stance in the lead-up to the Sochi Winter Olympics to be held four months later. Despite some major health issues she was facing, it was nice to see that time had not dimmed her fighting spirit.

    The next day, I was able to conduct on-camera interviews with both Susan and Jean, documenting their memories of participating in the Gay Games, as well as some of Susan’s other achievements. One of the funnier recollections was from her time competing at the Melbourne Olympics. She had been picked up and driven to a reception hosted by the USOC in the days following her competitions. It wasn’t until she got into the reception that she became aware of the fact that the man who she thought was merely a chauffeur, and walked into the party with her, was none other than Olympic legend Jesse Owens. Ah, the innocence of a 16-year-old high school student.

    In 2018, Susan announced that she had been dealing with an aggressive form of cancer, but still remained active online. She had moved to Hawaii by this time, but we continued to interact regularly on social media. We last texted on November 15, 2019.

    On November 30, she posted four articles - one dealing with women’s reproductive rights, two on climate change and its impact on the food supply, and one noting that smugglers had cut a hole in the US-Mexico border wall and were driving through it, which made us both laugh.

    Since I was preparing for a month-long holiday to Australia and New Zealand beginning two weeks later, I wasn’t as active on social media as I usually was. It wasn’t until I returned from my travels that I went to check in on her, only to discover that she had passed away later that same day - 30 November - after posting those items.

    In February 2019, we lost author-activist-athlete Patricia Nell Warren after her three-year battle with lung cancer. Her book “The Frontrunner” was one of the great touchstones of the LGBTIQ sports movement that helped inspire Tom Waddell to create the Gay Games. Patricia and I had been friends for more than two decades. She had served as an Honorary Co-Chair for the Los Angeles 2006 bid committee, and was my housemate in 2013-2015.

    Now, losing Susan was another major blow. Other than Jean Tretter, she was the only person left whom I had worked with on the Gay Games during my early years. As difficult as it was losing Patricia, Susan’s loss was even more difficult, since she was the one who had engaged and supported me as a novice in the LGBTQ+ sports movement: she was the one who had taken the flame and passed it on to me.

    During my time on the FGG Board, I made it a point to make sure those who were new to the family were given an education of those who came before them. Although participating at the Gay Games had become less a political statement for those from countries where LGBTIQ rights were making great strides, I was drawn to those whose work was breaking ground in their homelands. I felt it my obligation to provide for them what Susan, Patricia, Tom, Jean and other community leaders had done for so many of us in those early years.

    Working with organizers in Brazil, Mexico, Honduras, Russia, Bulgaria, South Africa, Cambodia, Hong Kong, and Southeast Asia, among other developing countries, has become my passion. Having launched a team at a time when there was no track record or example to follow allows me to understand the frustration and difficulties many of our new leaders still face today in places where their lives are threatened on a daily basis. Just as the flame had been passed to me, I now have the opportunity to pass it on for others, in hopes that we may someday live in a world where an event such as the Gay Games is merely a celebration instead of a statement for rights and equality.

    We have a long way to go to get to that point, but we owe it to the likes of Susan McGreivy and others to continue that fight to shine a light on the injustices we face.


  • 31 Jan 2020 10:30 | Anonymous

    PRESS RELEASE issued 31 January 2020


    Do You Want To Bring Gay Games XII To Your City In 2026?

    The first step in the Site Selection process to identify the host for the next Gay Games in 2026 is submitting a Request for Information (RFI) document. This is now available and can be received by contacting FGGBids@GayGames.net.

    For more information about the bidding process timelines please visit our website.

    Good luck!

    Hosting the Gay Games

    The positive financial impact to the host city of the Gay Games is clear, as evidenced by the official economic impact highlights from the 2018 Gay Games X in Paris:

    • Total economic impact: US $117.9 million.
    • Locals and non-locals contributed a total of US $72.7 million to the economy, in the areas of lodging, dining and entertainment, travel and other necessities, and tourism.
    • An additional US $45.8 million was generated in local incomes - roughly the equivalent of 1,429 full-time jobs.
    • 23% of participants were from France (12% from Paris).
    • 40% of local participants said they would have traveled outside Paris, France to participate in the Gay Games, taking their spend of US $9.2 million to another region.

    About the Federation of Gay Games

    The Gay Games was conceived by Dr. Tom Waddell, an Olympic decathlete, as a way to empower thousands of LGBTQ+ athletes and artists through sport, culture, and fellowship. It was first held in San Francisco in 1982. Subsequent Gay Games were held in San Francisco (1986), Vancouver (1990), New York (1994), Amsterdam (1998), Sydney (2002), Chicago (2006), Cologne (2010), Cleveland+Akron (2014), and Paris (2018). Gay Games 11 will be held in Hong Kong in 2022. Visit www.gaygameshk2022.com for more information.

    “Gay Games,” “Federation of Gay Games,” the interlocking circles device, and the phrase“Participation, Inclusion and Personal Best” are trademarks of the Federation of Gay Games, Inc. Trademarks are registered in the USA, Canada, Benelux, the UK, Germany, and Australia.

    Contact Information: 

    Shiv Paul, Officer of Communications. shiv.paul@gaygames.net

    Address:
    584 Castro Street, Suite 343, San Francisco, CA 94114 USA
    Phone: +1-866-459-1261

    Follow us on Social Media:

    Twitter

    Facebook

    IG


  • 20 Jan 2020 07:49 | Anonymous

    January 15, 2020, posted by Dennis Philipse

    Gay Games 11 Hong Kong 2022 has opened the process for top brands to start the formal evaluation of their partnership engagement with the landmark 2022 LGBTQ+ event in Hong Kong. 


    Selecting from a shortlist of qualifying Platinum Partner candidates no later than March 31, 2020, Gay Games 11 Hong Kong 2022 will conduct a series of discovery and ideation workshops through an exclusive Pre-Partnership Study (PrePS) process with at most 5 brand partners, from which it will select a maximum of 3 into the top tier Platinum Partnership.  Right of first and potentially exclusive access to all brandable assets of Gay Games 11 will be limited to PrePS participants. Platinum Partnerships will be announced after entering into an agreement no later than November 9, 2020, on the 2 year anniversary pre-dating Gay Games 11 Opening Ceremonies in Hong Kong Stadium.

    The 2022 event brings the iconic Gay Games, which featured Tina Turner at its first opening in 1982 in San Francisco, Barack Obama in Cleveland 2014, and Jean-Paul Gaultier in Paris 2018, as well as multiple sports world records, for the first time to Asia.  It will be a unique opportunity for global brands to authentically connect core brand values to Gay Games values, in front of 12,000 participants, hundreds of thousands of spectators, onlookers and volunteers, plus billions of media eyeballs—celebrating Participation, Inclusion and Personal Bests.

     Acceptance for LGBTQ+ rights has never been higher in Hong Kong, Asia and worldwide, as a recent study by Chinese University of Hong Kong has revealed, and stands as high as 80% with the most important demographic of 18-34 years old. Increasingly leading brands have found powerful and creative ways to connect through authentic LGBTQ+ engagement with the larger population, whether through the award-winning GayTM campaign by ANZ in Sydney or this year’s Alibaba Tmall Chinese New Year Campaign, earning trust and eyeballs at very low cost.

    Brands and creative agencies interested to join the process can contact Gay Games 11 Hong Kong 2022 here.

    More about Gay Games 11 Hong Kong 2022
    Gay Games is built upon the principles of Participation, Inclusion and Personal Best. Based on these values, since 1982, Gay Games have brought together people from all over the world with diversity, respect, equality, solidarity and sharing. Gay Games is open to participants of all ages, experience levels, sexual orientation, gender identity, and physical ability.

    Gay Games Hong Kong 2022 will be the 11th Gay Games, and the first to be held in Asia. The 9-days event will be in November 2022, 12,000 participants across 36 sports, 11 cultural events, festival village and opening & closing ceremonies plus 75,000 spectators and 3,000 volunteers.

    There are many ways how you or your organisation can be involved to support Gay Games 11 Hong Kong 2022, as volunteer, donor, fundraiser and more. Check our Get Involved page now! 

  • 09 Jan 2020 10:39 | Anonymous

    The world’s largest annual LGBTQ sporting event enters its 13th year with over 8,000 participants competing in Las Vegas in 24 sports.


    Produced by the Greater Los Angeles Softball Association (GLASA) and presented by Lexus, the Sin City Classic Sports Festival will take place in Las Vegas January 16-19, 2020. This year’s Festival adds four new sports: basketball, indoor rowing, spikeball, and steel tip darts - bringing the total number of sports participating in the Festival to 24.

      

    “Each year the Sin City Classic continues to grow and brings even more LGBTQ athletes, allies and fans to Las Vegas for a weekend filled with competition and camaraderie. Our nightly events continue to get bigger and better, and we’re happy to be able to offer attendees the opportunity to come together and bond of sport,” said Ken Scearce, tournament director for the Sin City Classic.

    Each January the festival brings together LGBTQ sports associations from around the world in order for LGBTQ athletes, fans and allies to enjoy a weekend full of competition, companionship and fun. In addition to a full roster of sporting competitions, the festival includes nightly social events, including an Opening Night registration party and the Closing Night celebration, which will be held at the LINQ Promenade’s Brooklyn Bowl.

    The Federation of Gay Games has been a strong supporter of the Sin City Classic for many years, with many of its leaders actively taking part. In 2020, several FGG Board members will be represented, and the 2022 Gay Games 11 in Hong Kong will be aggressively promoted at future Sin City Classic Festivals. Watch this space for more news reports and photos from the 2020 Sin City Classic.

    For more information about the Sin City Classic or to register, please visit www.sincityclassic.org.

  • 28 Dec 2019 11:36 | Anonymous

    During December, the organizers of Gay Games 11, Hong Kong 2022 announced four news updates.


    1) FIRST EVER HONG KONG PRIDE RUN A SUCCESS

    Pride Run Hong Kong 2019 held on 1 December, was a resounding and sold out success! This is the first time that a Pride Run or Rainbow Run has been held in Hong Kong. With 450 registrations representing 27 countries, beautiful weather, and an excited crowd, a good time was enjoyed by all! Plans call for this to become an annual event leading up to Gay Games 11 in 2022.

      

    Congratulations to our friends in Hong Kong!

    To read more about this event, CLICK HERE.

    + + + + + + + + + + +

    2) CHRISTOF WITTIG APPOINTED DIRECTOR OF FUNDRAISING

    On 11 December, the appointment of Christof Wittig was announced as Director Fundraising for Gay Games 11 Hong Kong 2022. Christof joins with significant experience in the LGBTQ+ community.  He currently serves as CEO and Founder of Hornet, a gay social network established in 2011 with over 25 million diverse users worldwide. Christof has been at the lead of several digital startups.  Christof also serves as the President of the LGBT Foundation, a non-profit organization that aims to deliver equality for, and advance the cause of, the LGBT community across the world.


    To read more about this appointment, CLICK HERE.

    + + + + + + + + + + +

    3) SABRINA YANG APPOINTED AS CO-CHAIR OF GAY GAMES 11 HONG KONG 2022

    On 26 December, the appointment of Sabrina Yang was announced as co-chair of the Gay Games 11 Hong Kong 2022 team, alongside Dennis Philipse.

    Sabrina joined the Gay Games 11 Hong Kong 2022 management team in September 2018 as Director of Sports. She has been successfully building and leading the sports team working together with NSAs (national sports associations) as well as International LGBT+ sports organisations to organise the 36 sports events in Hong Kong. Sabrina will continue her role as Director of Sports and will now assume in addition the role of co-chair of the team, leading the team to organise the Gay Games in November 2022.


    To read more about this appointment, CLICK HERE.

    + + + + + + + + + + +

    4) EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH 4 HONG KONG SPORTS LEADERS

    To learn the very latest on the LGBTQI sports scene in Hong Kong, check out this exclusive interview with four key members of the Gay Games 11 Hong Kong 2022 team. This interview was published in COMPETE Magazine on 27 December. Read it HERE.

  • 19 Dec 2019 10:20 | Anonymous

    PRESS RELEASE issued 19 December 2019


    The Federation of Gay Games (FGG) announces the bidding process to host the 2026 Gay Games XII has begun. Cities that are interested in hosting the world’s largest sport and culture event open to all are invited to contact FGGBids@GayGames.net to get more information on, and to start, the bidding process.Official information including details on timeline and process is available at www.GayGames.org. The deadline for submitting an Official FGG Request for Information (RFI) document is 11:59pm Pacific time 21 Feb 2020.

    Gay Games is open to all, and since its debut in 1982 it has continued to perpetuate the legacy of changing cultural, social and political attitudes towards LGBTQ+ people. A core principle of the Federation of Gay Games is “Participation, Inclusion and Personal Best™”. These principles will be represented next in 2022 at Gay Games 11 in Hong Kong. It has never been more important to stand up for the rights of the LGBTQ+ communities around the world.

    The positive financial impact to the host city of the Gay Games is clear, as evidenced by the official economic impact highlights from the 2018 Gay Games X in Paris:

    • Total economic impact: US $117.9 million.
    • Locals and non-locals contributed a total of US $72.7 million to the economy, in the areas of lodging, dining and entertainment, travel and other necessities, and tourism.
    • An additional US $45.8 million was generated in local incomes - roughly the equivalent of 1,429 full-time jobs.
    • 23% of participants were from France (12% from Paris).
    • 40% of local participants said they would have traveled outside Paris, France to participate in theGay Games, taking their spend of US $9.2 million to another region.

    About the Federation of Gay Games

    The Gay Games was conceived by Dr. Tom Waddell, an Olympic decathlete, as a way to empower thousands of LGBTQ+ athletes and artists through sport, culture, and fellowship. It was first held in San Francisco in 1982. Subsequent Gay Games were held in San Francisco (1986), Vancouver (1990), New York (1994), Amsterdam (1998), Sydney (2002), Chicago (2006), Cologne (2010), Cleveland+Akron (2014), and Paris (2018). Gay Games 11 will be held in Hong Kong in 2022. Visit www.gaygameshk2022.com for more information.

    “Gay Games,” “Federation of Gay Games,” the interlocking circles device, and the phrase“Participation, Inclusion and Personal Best” are trademarks of the Federation of Gay Games, Inc. Trademarks are registered in the USA, Canada, Benelux, the UK, Germany, and Australia.

    Contact Information: 

    Shiv Paul, Officer of Communications. shiv.paul@gaygames.net

    Address:
    584 Castro Street, Suite 343, San Francisco, CA 94114 USA
    Phone: +1-866-459-1261

    Follow us on Social Media:

    Twitter

    Facebook

    IG

  • 14 Dec 2019 14:08 | Anonymous

    FGG member organization International Front Runners (IFR) is proud to announce the election of its new President Chris Rauchle, a member of Sydney Frontrunners and the long-time IFR Australia, Asia Pacific Regional Representative.


    Chris Rauchle with the Sydney Frontrunners


    Chris Rauchle running alongside the Sydney Opera House

    Chris takes over from Danny Luong, who represented IFR at the Paris Gay Games and fostered a landmark partnership with Brooks Running. Danny will continue to oversee the Brooks / IFR scholarship program and we thank him for his service as president of IFR and his continuing involvement. Of note is that Chris is the first President of IFR from outside the United States, which highlights that the fast-growing family of 113 LGBTQ+ running clubs on 5 continents is now comprised of a majority of non-U.S. clubs.


    Chris Rauchle is a 52 year old IT Project Manager originally from Queensland he has been living in Sydney, New South Wales for 30 years.

    He has been running seriously for 15 years. Taking it up as part of triathlon, he found that with the right shoes and enough spare time he could run very much farther than his original distance of 400 meters around his local park. Working his way up from 5k to the half marathon in a series of races in Sydney he eventually took on his first marathon and now enjoys running this distance although he will never win any races. As a side effect of diet and exercise (go figure!) he lost 20kgs (40lb) after taking up running regularly in 2004 and enjoys the time running alone, with the Sydney Frontrunners, or with his "Red Dog" Kelpie, Jessie, in the outdoors when running around his local park, Centennial Park. This is the park the Sydney Frontrunners use for their regular runs.

    Having been involved with the Sydney LGBTQI+ community for 30 years (almost as long as Sydney Frontrunners has been around) Chris has been the Sydney Frontrunners webmaster and been on the Sydney Frontrunners committee in various roles. He has project-managed the charity Little Black Dress Run for five years which has raised up to $54,000 annually for children living with HIV+ and Youth programs. He has been the Asia/Pacific representative for International Frontrunners for four years.

    Chris is interested in growing the organisation in Asia, South America, and Africa. He has visited the cities with Frontrunners clubs in Australia, New Zealand and Japan several times over the last few years for work and pleasure. Not wanting to wait for the legalisation of same-sex marriage in Australia, he and his now husband, John, were married in Wellington, New Zealand in 2015, another city with a vibrant Frontrunners club.

    When the opportunity to be the first President outside of North America presented itself, he leapt at the chance to show the truly global nature of our community of LGTBQI+ runners where it is possible to share good fellowship and exercise in more than one hundred cities around the world.

  • 19 Nov 2019 12:52 | Anonymous

    The FGG recently welcomed to its ranks as a full member organisation the Federacion Mexicana Deportivo de la Diversidad (FMDD). This group is based in Guadalajara but is national in scope, featuring 36 sports on its web site.

    Here is some more information about FMDD:

    Q: What motivated FMDD to apply for FGG membership?

    A: Our motivation came after the bid process for Gay Games 2022. We became truly inspired by Tom Waddell’s legacy, the Gay Games, and decided to move forward in this new project to support our community in Mexico.

    Q: What does it mean to FMDD and your organization to become a member of the FGG?

    A: To become a member of FGG means having the tools to better support and help our LGBTQI sports community while building FMDD. It means that we have international exposure and finally an extensive networking platform.

    Q: How does FMDD plan to engage with the Federation of Gay Games in the upcoming months and years?

    A: As our federation is new, all help and know-how are appreciated. Our plans include providing the FGG with information (updates, invitations, etc.) so that it may be included in the FGG newsletter. It is our main goal to increase the number of Mexican representatives in upcoming Gay Games.

    Q: What events and other activities does FMDD have planned in the next year?

    A: FMDD will generate in a structured and coordinated manner several sporting activities and events in various disciplines throughout the year as well as an annual National Championship.

    Learn more about FMDD on Facebook or at their website.

  • 16 Nov 2019 17:09 | Anonymous

    Founded in 1977, Frameline is the San Francisco International LGBTQ+ Film Festival. It is the longest-running, largest, and most widely recognized LGBTQ+ film exhibition event in the world.

    On 14 November, in honor of Trans Awareness Week, Frameline proudly presented the movie “Man Made” in Oakland, CA and invited The Federation of Gay Games to help promote this thought provoking and eye-opening documentary.

    Scene from "Man Made"

    FGG Officer of Sports Reggie Snowden and Honorary Life Member Roger Brigham were invited to speak during the post-screening Q & A session. Said Reggie “when Frameline reached out to the Federation in search of support for the screening of “Man Made,” we jumped on the opportunity to show our support by contacting folks in our network to also support this documentary. I also invited everybody in the audience to participate in Gay Games 11 in Hong Kong in November 2022.”

    “Man Made” chronicles the lives of trans male athletes in a sport (bodybuilding) filled with preconceived notions of what the acceptable standard is and challenging themselves on various levels to achieve their personal best on stage and in life. “Man Made” tells the stories of four trans male athletes from different perspectives and goals but shared similar story lines of coming together at the world’s only all transgender bodybuilding competition called Trans Fitcom in Atlanta, Georgia.

    The trans male filmmaker, T Cooper, sacrificed a full year build up for the competition, but it was not only about the competition, but the journeys all four competitors went through. Included were interviews with partners and supporters, their lifestyles including dieting, and even an inspiring search for ones mother’s. After 25 years, Dominic Chilko decided to explore who his biological mother was, and the documentary briefly shows this as it unfolds. “Man Made” showed the personal triumph of trans male athletes who have had top surgery and the emotional elation with first glance after removing the bandages. For some competitors, their dream was to continue bodybuilding in more than Trans Fitcom and this film brought it all together in the end. The camaraderie established among all of them through the sport of bodybuilding and being trans male athletes was commented on during the Q & A after the movie with Dominic Chilko also present.

    To learn more about “Man Made,” click HERE.

    Left to right: Kin Folkz (Q&A session moderator), Reggie Snowden (FGG Officer of Sports), Roger Brigham (FGG Honorary Life Member)


  • 16 Nov 2019 10:53 | Anonymous

    Federation of Gay Games Officer of Site Selection Dave Killian was honored as a “Game Changer” by Connect Sports in their Fall, 2019 issue. A total of 19 industry experts were profiled; that illustrious group included Dave.

    These “Game Changers” are described as follows…

    “Sports tourism is, above all else, a relationship business. Event professionals drive big business to communities through innovative practices and smart networking. Few do this better than these 19 individuals. They are a perfect representation of this close-knit, diverse industry.”

    Well earned, Dave. To read the entire article, click HERE.





    In addition, the Federation of Gay Games was also recognized by Connect Sports as a winner of the 2019 Connect Sports Tourism Excellence Awards. These people, events and facilities were recognized at the Connect Sports Expo in Louisville, Kentucky in late August, 2019. The FGG received a stunning silver ring, pictured below.


     

    Below is a photo of all the Sports Excellence Award winners receiving their rings. Fourth and fifth from the right are Les Johnson (FGG VP of External Affairs) and Dave Killian (FGG Officer of Site Selection).


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